Drug driving b&w

Driving Under The Influence Of Drugs

Driving under the influence of drugs is illegal. Find out how it affects you and the facts about being caught.

If you suspect a drug driver you can ring the Police on 101, alternatively you can also contact Crimestoppers to report the crime anonymously. They will pass on the information to the Police.

The facts are simple – driving under the influence of drugs significantly increases accident, injury and fatality risk. The law is equally simple – drugs that may impair your driving ability are illegal for motorists. You may think you’re fine to get behind the wheel, but science argues otherwise.

The Reality

Driving under the influence of drugs significantly increases accident, injury and fatality risk

Drugs that may impair your driving ability are illegal for motorists

Know your limits

It is against the law to drive under the influence of illegal drugs, or if you have certain drugs above a specified level in your blood.

Officers can test for cannabis and cocaine at the roadside, and screen for other drugs, including ecstasy, LSD, ketamine and heroin at a police station.

Even drivers that pass roadsides check can be arrested if police suspect that your driving is impaired by drugs.

The Consequences

Drink driving penalties may include:

  • A minimum 12 month driving ban
  • A criminal record
  • A hefty fine
  • Up to 6 months in prison
  • An endorsement on your licence for 11 years

ADDITIONAL Consequences

ADDItional consequences of drink driving convictions:

  • Job loss
  • Loss of independence
  • A criminal record
  • Increase in car insurance costs
  • Trouble entering countries like the USA and Australia
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WHAT you should consider

Driving under the influence of drugs is extremely dangerous and can impair driving in a number of ways.

Cannabis slows reaction and decision times. It can also distort perception of time and distance, and result in poorer concentration and control of the vehicle.

Cocaine leads to a sense of over-confidence and this is reflected in the user’s driving style. Users typically perform higher risk, more aggressive manoeuvres at greater speeds.

Ecstasy (MDMA) is extremely dangerous to drive on because it results in distorted vision, heightened perception of sounds, altered perception and judgment of risks and an over-confident driving attitude.

As drugs exit the user’s system, they may feel fatigued, confused and unable to concentrate. Driving in any of these conditions is a bad idea – not just for the driver but for their passengers and other road users.

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